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Rights of the Accused: Double Jeopardy, Criminal Procedure, Due Process, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jury Trial Source Wikipedia

Rights of the Accused: Double Jeopardy, Criminal Procedure, Due Process, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jury Trial

Source Wikipedia

Published August 15th 2011
ISBN : 9781156586518
Paperback
88 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 86. Chapters: Double jeopardy, Criminal procedure, Due process, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 86. Chapters: Double jeopardy, Criminal procedure, Due process, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jury trial, Novgorod case, Stop and identify statutes, Habeas corpus in the United States, Pro se legal representation in the United States, Right to silence, Substantive due process, R v Thomas, Public defender, Presumption of innocence, Right to a fair trial, Section Eleven of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Criminal Procedure Code, 1973, Confrontation Clause, Legal professional privilege in Australia, Attorney-client privilege, Aguilar-Spinelli test, Consent search, Self-incrimination, Open fields doctrine, Duty solicitor, Ex officio oath, Mere evidence rule, Void for vagueness, Pleading the Fifth, Right to counsel, Litigant in person, Speedy trial, Duty counsel, Prophylactic rule, In dubio pro reo, Dunaway warning, Antommarchi Rights, McNabb-Mallory rule. Excerpt: The Novgorod Case is the conventional term used in the Russian blogosphere and mass media for the controversial criminal case against Mrs. Antonina Martynova (formerly Fyodorova, n e Stepanova). She is facing charges of attempted murder of her daughter Alisa, then two years and seven months old, based solely on an 11-year-old boys eyewitness account. Antonina is being prosecuted under Articles 30.3 (Preparations for a Crime, and Attempted Crimes) and 105.2 (Murder) of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (CC-RF henceforth- these links and other Code(s) links below are for the English translation(s) of the latest versions of the Code(s), those currently in force in Russia). The case has been the subject of broad-ranging public debate in Russian media, online communities and blogs. The discussion began in April 2007 with a post in the (Russian-language) blog of Antoninas husband (her domestic partner at the time), Mr. Kirill Mar...